Saturday, March 1, 2014

FMTSO: Stained Glass

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This stained glass window is found in the Gustav Adolf Church in Borås, built in 1903-06.

The apostle depicted is St Peter, to whom Jesus said “I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven” (Gospel of Matthew 16:19).

At the bottom of the window you also see the town’s coat of arm, which consists of two sheep shears.

 

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(The window to the left, on the wall next to the pulpit.)

Friday My Town Shoot Out

13 comments:

  1. so beautiful... that church is wonderful and I still like that giant exclamation point....

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  2. A spectacular window in an impressive church. I know I'm drifting off topic but that is a very grand pulpit, isn't it? I've never seen one like it!

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    1. Elevated pulpits like that were/are standard here in old Protestant/Lutheran churches, Pauline (and I think you'll find them in many Anglican churches in England as well). In most evangelical free churches though, a simpler kind of lectern was/is preferred. (Most of the free churches don't have stained glass windows either - nor a bell tower).

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    2. I've seen these in the Roman Catholic churches also. Maybe at one point it was common to preach from the sides of the church, or maybe singing.....

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    3. The pulpit is used for preaching and Bible readings (esp the readings from the Gospels). The practical reason has to do with acoustics - remember there were no microphones and loudspeakers back in those days :) And of course in a big church it also allows everyone to see the preacher - and the preacher to see everyone in the congregation as well. I've never seen an elevated pulpit of this kind used for singing (except perhaps chanting done by the priest when leading the congregation in prayer etc). The pulpit is for the Word.

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  3. That is an impressive church for its era and rather a splendid window too. I'm really sorry but I have to tell you that when I read the Gospel quote I immediately wondered what Peter (because, of course, he wasn't a saint then) had done with the keys to the Pearly Gates once they had been entrusted to him.

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    1. Well Graham, I think he did his best to use them as was the mission: to open the gates for others who were prepared to learn to forgive and be forgiven. Anyway I doubt he should be blamed for all actions taken in the name of the church since his day. According to tradition, Peter was crucified in Rome under Emperor Nero, and at his own request upside down, because he saw himself unworthy to be crucified in the same way as Jesus. Somehow I doubt he would have 100% appreciated being sanctified on earth and put into stained glass windows. But that's just my guess, of course (based on the Book of Acts).

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    2. ...or: my understanding of said book...

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  4. Marvelous post DT. I agree with Pauline an unusual pulpit. That church is beautiful.

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  5. I think this kind of pulpit belongs to an older tradition here in Europe and is therefore likely to be less common in the US, NZ or Australia.

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  6. I love the stained glass window, and the church is cute too.
    Most of our older churches have elevated pulpits (reached by steps), but the more modern churches have lecterns/podiums.
    Maybe I'm a traditional church goer from the by-gone era, but I feel more reverent in an older church and the sanctum feels holier.

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  7. That's a great window, and I love the church in general. Such a pretty sight.

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