Monday, July 27, 2015

Mosaic Monday – Alingsås (2)

2015-07-20 Christinae kyrka 1

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This church in Alingsås, Christinae kyrka, was built between 1642-1651 and named after the Christina who was Queen of Sweden around that time; and who donated money to have this church built.

An interesting fact about Christina in this context is that in 1654, she abdicated the throne, converted to Roman Catholicism and moved to Rome. (The Church of Sweden has been Lutheran since the mid 1500s.)

The rounded parish house (seen to the left of the church in the bottom photos of the collage) was added in 2003.

12 comments:

  1. what a magnificent church both inside and outside! a nice aside about the queen Christina. I wonder what prompted that change.
    thanks for sharing
    Nonnie

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    1. Norma, if you click on the link in my post you'll find a lenghty article about her in Wikipedia. She inherited the throne while she was still just a child. She seems to have found herself drawn the Catholic religion already in childhood; and later on also made the decision not to marry (and so of course also would not give birth to another heir to the throne). Instead she chose to abdicate and follow her own heart in these matters.

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  2. I was thinking what a pleasant modern church this is until I read how old it is. The alter painting lets it down. Looks as if primary school children have been let loose. Still a beautiful building.

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    1. Adrian, the altar piece is from 1945 and painted by Bo Beskow (1906-1989). He also made the stained glass windows to the left and right of the altar (40 years later, 1985). He's quite famous here, not least for another series of stained glass windows in a cathedral I'll be showing later on.

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  3. The church has a nice and airy look and feel about it, very light, not as gloomy, even oppressive, as one sometimes finds the atmosphere in very old, dark churches here.
    Nothing wrong with the altar painting; it just is a bit unexpected because it is so much younger than the rest of the church.

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  4. It was a nice surprise to find this church open on a Monday; even if the chances are better in tourist-frequented town churches than out in the countryside. Friends of mine got married here back in the early 90s. But on such occasions one's focus is of course on the "event" rather than on details of architecture! :)

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  5. this might be my favorite church photos, i like the simple but elegant look.. and the additon all though new, fits with the old church and i really really like that parrish house

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  6. I love it when bloggers go traveling, especially when they visit churches. It's hard to believe this one is so old, it's so light and airy. Interesting read about the eccentric queen, thanks.

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    1. Pauline, this is the first time since I started blogging that I've been able to go travelling like this (more than an occasional daytrip). There will be more churches along the way... :)

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  7. This was a beautiful tour...so glad to took me along.

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  8. Well I wandered off into Lutheran history (it was astonishing how much I had forgotten) and then my 'lunch break' was over before I could comment. My immediate reaction was that it was a reasonably modern church because few old churches in the Uk are so light and airy. It's very attractive.

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    1. Thanks for taking an interest :) There will be a few more churches along the way.

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