Saturday, January 13, 2018

Postcards for the Weekend – Winter Scenes

Christmas card
Postcrossing card from Belarus, January 2018
 

In Sweden, 13th January is St Knut’s Day, or the 20th day of Christmas; and traditionally this is when we “throw out Christmas” (the tree and other decorations) and eat up left-overs like the ginger bread house (if we made one!). At least that was still the tradition back in my childhood (1950s/early 60s). There were usually one or more children’s “Christmas tree plundering parties” to go to this time of year – and I think my mum hosted one or two of those, too (for me and some of my neighbourhood friends/ primary school classmates).


Christmas decorations

Postcrossing card from France, January 2018


171221 NO UKä

Christmas card from a Swedish friend living in Norway

Not really sure how well the Knut Day traditions have been ♥preserved♥ throughout the years… My impression is that many people nowadays throw out Christmas earlier (maybe because they also start decorating earlier). As for myself, I do usually still keep my decorations up until mid January. Anyway, this year I did, with the extra excuse that I also had my brother visiting Wednesday-Friday this past week. Today, I did not feel inspired to get on with it either – feeling I had enough other things to do (including the important task of just lying on my back and read most of the afternoon...) Maybe Monday??  

Outdoors it’s been another grey week here; with bare ground and temperatures hovering just around 0°C (freezing point).


Weekend Linky Party:

Postcards for the Weekend 68: Winter Scenes

23 comments:

  1. I didn't know about the "Knut Day". In Spain, the tradition says that you must put up the crib on 8th December, and keep it until 2nd January. But I don't think people is follow this tradition any more. I love the postcards you shared. The third one made me smile. It's a good design, even if I would be incapable of cut a tree for the sake of Christmas decorations... :)

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    1. Eva, while my parents always had a real full size tree for Christmas, I've never had one... Mine is a small artificial one (60 cm high) which I've had for over 30 years! :)

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  2. "Knut" has become known here in Germany through IKEA adverts, and indeed it is the date many communities have organised picking up Christmas trees from designated places by the road side. Decorations usually come down on the 6th of January, althoug some leave them until the 2nd of Feb., which is "Mariä Lichtmeß" for Catholics.
    I like it that you completed the important task of lying on your back and reading all afternoon!

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    1. "First things first", Meike! ;) ... (And I had no idea that the Knut tradition had spread to Germany via Ikea!)

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  3. Beautiful postcards this week. Now I've learned something new, Knut Day. I use to take my tree down the day after Christmas, now each year it seems like it stays up longer, like you I have to get in the mood to take it down.

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    1. Janet, in my childhood the Christmas tree did not come into the house until the day before Christmas Eve, and in my own traditions I still keep to putting up decorations gradually - starting with window lights at 1st Advent, adding a crib and some angels at St Lucy's Day (13th Dec), and the tree and gnomes not until a couple of days before Christmas Eve. And then in January I usually take things down in reversed order - but not until after Epiphany.

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  4. I like the first one best! Around here, many keep their decorations up till epiphany.

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    1. Ginny, I believe most people here probably keep theirs up until epiphany too.

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  5. My family puts away the Christmas decorations at Epiphany, the 12th day of Christmas, January 6. I make the first Christmas cake the day after the Melbourne Cup which is in the first week of November. Decorations, cards, tree, special foods - all accumulate between then and Christmas Day. I have friends who put up some LED lights outdoors about 10 years ago. They are still there and look pretty any night they feel like switching them on. I feel it is my job to enjoy every Christmas as much as I can, just in case I have no more. This idea is working well.

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    1. Louise, my Christmas tends to last between mid November and mid January too. And the lights on my balcony may remain up even longer, it rather depends on the weather when I feel like taking them down (as well as putting them up)...

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  6. Wonderful postcards. Love the designs and drawings. Didn't know about Knut Day. Hope those freezing temperatures will keep rising.

    Mersad
    Mersad Donko Photography

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    1. Mersad, February and March (at least) will still be very unreliable here, and no way to tell too long in advance which way the temperatures will turn...

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  7. Replies
    1. Thanks Sandra. Yes, even though Christmas is over, I thought a few more cards from my "harvest" were worth showing :)

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  8. I was intrigued by the use of a Mini in the last postcard.

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    1. Well, Graham... I suppose it had to be a Mini to fit inside a jar...? (smile)

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  9. I have never had a gingerbread house, but as I am going through these Winter Scenes posts, I am easting the last of the Christmas shortbread. Love that mini :)

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    1. Violet, my mum used to make gingerbread houses (even if not as elaborately decorated as those on that postcard) but I never made one. I'm eating the last few of my gingerbread biscuits, though...

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  10. Also to me Knut day is new - thank you for letting us learn! - and I like it that the tree is kept for more days than is usance in my country. Here in the Netherlands some people throw out their christmas tree some days after New Year's Day, some others say it has to be until the day after 'Three Kings Day'(6 January), and in my childhood my parents kept the tree until half of January. I prefer the latter, because I love to see the christmas tree lights bring light also to the dark days in January.

    The past years we didn't have the christmas tree standing in the living room (we have an artificial, too, since ages the same one, because I feel bad to keep a real tree for only a few weeks in the house, think it a pity that the tree will pass away in the end, but that is my personal opinion, most Dutch buy a real tree each year). But in future we will do again, and I surely will be thinking of Knut day, then!

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    1. Heleen, I packed up most of my Christmas decorations today, the tree included. May be keeping the electric candles in the windows for a few more days - we'll see...

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  11. I'm one information richer today! Thank you for sharing about the Knut's Day and the Christmas tree plundering parties tradition in Sweden. I would have love participating in one! Thank you for sharing these lovely cards as well. Have a nice week ahead!

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