Wednesday, August 12, 2015

Canal Museum – Trollhättan (2)

CIMG5347-001

The day we spent in Trollhättan the sky was grey and it rained nearly all day. Ah well… Our plan included looking at a lot of water anyway (locks and waterfalls). So what’s a few more drops from the sky?

However, we decided to dodge the first heavy shower by a visit to the Canal Museum.

CIMG5346-001

Old lock keeper’s cabin outside. And some other things.

CIMG5348CIMG5349

CIMG5338-001

Indoors in the museum they have models of the canal and locks, and lots of old photos and documents and various objects.

CIMG5332-001

CIMG5334-001

CIMG5340-001

Furniture from a captain’s cabin.

CIMG5341-001

Collection of signs with various titles for people working at the canal and locks – including for example canal inspector, port guard, lock guard, extra bridge guard etc.

2015-07-20--21 kanalmuseum

Left: The sense of time-travelling enhanced by meeting myself in a large mirror. Right: Old diver’s suit.

CIMG5343-001

CIMG5335-001

Linking to Our World Tuesday

17 comments:

  1. Are these canals still used by the narrow boats, for people who love boating on canals? My husband and I have seen some tv programs about narrow boats in the UK, and France.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ever since 1916, the canal and locks at Trollhättan still takes cargo ships up to 90 m long and weighing 4000 tons, Terra. I'll write more about it in my next post.

      Delete
  2. I love this kind of museum! But the outside is a novelty to me. My son is still hoping to get work in Gothenburg, so maybe I will visit Sweden one day! Thanks, as always, for sharing your lovely area.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If one day you do, Kate, Borås is only about an hour away from Gothenburg by car, bus or train...

      Delete
    2. ... and the same goes for Trollhättan, come to think of it! :)

      Delete
  3. It's lovely to walk into the museum and also see whatever they had outside

    ReplyDelete
  4. I am feeling envious again. This really is interesting. I never realised these are ship sized locks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They are indeed, Adrian. You'll see more of the locks in my next post. Alas there was no big ship passing while we were watching, though.

      Delete
  5. It's the right kind of place to visit on a rainy day! I love models of landscapes and places and can spend a long time looking at them closely.
    I easily understood most of the signs but can't work out "bro". Is it Swedish for bridge?
    The captain's cabin looks very elegant!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The museum was a good place to start and get a bit of a repetition about the history, Meike. And yes "bro" in Swedish means bridge.

      Delete
  6. Now that I would really have enjoyed immensely.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Graham, it did strike me while walking around there, that we often don't get round to visiting museums etc close to home except perhaps when we have visitors. Coming back as a tourist 40 years after moving away was quite fun! (Any museums in Stornoway?)

      Delete
    2. Yes Monica there is a avery good museum in Stornoway although it is in the process of being relocated and improved at the moment.

      Delete
  7. I love all the interesting displays, especially the one with the waterway and the locks.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I like that lock keepers tiny cabin and the cabin furniture and the barrel and YOU in the mirror. a great way to avoid the rain

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think museums are the kind of places that do often benefit from a bit of bad weather, Sandra!

      Delete

Communication is what makes blogging fun :)
... but spam comments will be deleted!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...